Bite resistant stick antenna puts extra distance between animal professionals and aggressive, feral or stressed animals for easier identification and faster reunification

WOBURN, Mass. MAY 20, 2013 – Datamars (www.datamars.com), a leading global supplier of high performance RFID-based solutions today announced the immediate availability of XTEND MAX, an innovative new microchip scanner designed for use without direct contact by placing significant distance between aggressive, feral or stressed animals and the animal professionals who are trying to identify and evaluate them for increased safety. The XTEND MAX scanner was developed with input from Found Animals (www.foundanimals.org), a privately-funded foundation, who recognized the need for safer scanning methods for animal care professionals.

XTEND MAX is ideal for animal shelters, rescues, humane societies and animal control agencies that routinely work with unknown and unpredictable animals, especially those coming from abusive or neglectful situations where substantive human interaction may have been lacking. XTEND MAX includes a standard microchip scanner together with an extended, fixed stick antenna that can place between two and six feet of additional space between an individual and an animal – allowing identity scanning to take place early in an intervention to hopefully help speed the reunification process of the animal with its owner.

XTEND MAX can be worn around the neck using the included lanyard to be able to use the stick antenna one-handed, leaving one hand free for protection or to work with the animal. When working in pairs, one animal control officer can stand back with the read unit while the other comes further forward with the stick antenna in an attempt to ascertain whether an animal has a microchip, and thus maybe an owner.

“We saw the need for a cost-effective universal scanner that protects the safety of animal care providers,” said Found Animals Executive Director Aimee Gilbreath. “We found the perfect partner in Datamars, and felt confident that they could take our feedback and turn it into a useful tool that would benefit both the animals and the teams who serve them.”

XTEND MAX is bite resistant and built to withstand a lot of abuse whether indoors or in the field. XTEND MAX is a universal scanner, meaning it can read companion animal microchips that operate on all frequencies: 125 kHz, 128 kHz and 134.2 kHz, including all of those available today: Found Animals, Microfindr, Datamars, resQ, HomeAgain, 24PetWatch, AKC CAR, Avid and Trovan.

“This challenge was particularly motivating. We wanted to be sure to develop something equal in quality to our traditional microchip scanners, but that could withstand the conditions unique to this type of situation,” comments Brian Zapach, general manager of Datamars, Inc. “We look forward to working with Found Animals and our customers to bring this much needed new scanner to the animal welfare industry. Keep your eyes on us for further animal identification innovations in the coming months!”

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About Datamars

Datamars is the global leader for high-performance RFID solutions for the companion animal, livestock and textile identification markets. Our expertise, track record of technological innovation and profound understanding of customers’ needs have earned Datamars a reputation for unsurpassed quality and performance. Datamars employs more than 400 people with offices in Europe, Asia, and the Americas. Datamars is a private company, headquartered in Bedano, Switzerland.  For more information, please visit www.datamars.com.

About Found Animals

Found Animals is an independently funded nonprofit that works to achieve one goal – find the big ideas that help reduce the number of pets euthanized in shelters each year. Led by business and medical professionals, Found Animals works directly within the animal welfare community to reduce the use of euthanasia in shelters by supporting programs including: pet adoption, spay/neuter services, pet identification, and sterilization research. Follow the progress online at www.FoundAnimals.org or via social media at Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.